Tuesday, 24 March 2020

What Should I Do Before or After a Massage?



In a quiet corner of Horsell Common, not far from my home in Woking, off Monument Road there is Muslim Burial Ground, now a Peace Garden. 

A visit there can bring peace, whether needing to settle one’s mind before a massage or other treatment, or to maintain a sense of peace after a session.


Nearby is an area of tall trees, the setting for H.G. Wells’ ‘The War of the Worlds’, in an atmospheric and mystical environment. There need not be anything alien about treatments though. 

For example, the therapist will put you at ease if it is your first visit, hopefully making you soon feel relaxed and ‘at home’.

Taking a stroll to, or from, an appointment through this area of Horsell Common on a fine day or light evening can be very pleasant. 

Even passing the area if travelling by car, one can see the natural beauty of the surroundings. All this can contribute in some way toward the ‘before’ and ‘after’ of treatments, giving heightened awareness; a sense of holistic help; experiencing a peaceful and stress-free encounter, giving lasting benefit.


There is also ‘The Martian’ sculpture in Woking Town Centre. But then again, there is nothing spooky or suspicious in the treatments. You won’t have set foot on another planet, though you may feel you have, with a luxurious massage

Neither will your encounter be of ‘The Third Kind’. But all will be well, with friendly human care and attention given, not alien, which can often be hurtful, harmful, hostile. 

And yet – bring a camera if you wish. You might see E.T. if he has not gone home, or the Loch Ness Monster in the Basingstoke Canal if it has moved South!


Monday, 16 March 2020

Should I have a Massage when there is flu epidemic?



Coronavirus is very much at the top of everyone's mind these days

So as massage involves touching another person, is this wise? This is a question for these times, but is also relevant whether there is any flu epidemic or not.


With massage there is the necessity of touching the relevant part or parts of the clients, though the highest standards of hygiene will be in operation, as it fact it will always been with any good masseur. 

We may highlight more at this time things such as washing hands properly. This is one basic thing in human life, relevant to any day.

Though we may observe other people not washing their hands after using public toilets. There may not even be a quick whisking of the hands under the tap and in the dryer. 

Then again, not to blame the cleaners, but a visit to a public toilet can turn out, aptly, to be convenient, or an awful horror. It’s ‘too much information’ to give the obvious details of this.


If we had x-rays eyes, we might see germs and other nasties  on things such as door handles, shop doors, objects in house or home, or wherever. 

We know we need not be paranoid, nor excessive, such as in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD), which sometimes includes extreme hand washing.

In all doing our part to maintain basic cleanliness, a lot of which is surely common sense, the outcome will hopefully be to keep health scares of disease, contamination, etc, to a minimum.

We may have to do without, or limit, touch in some areas of life for a while. But we can trust a reputable and professional massage therapist, and take a balanced approach. 

It can certainly be a positive experience to have a hands-on massage whether that's Swedish, Sports, Shiatsu or Hot Stone Massage.

Friday, 6 March 2020

Occam's Razor and Male Waxing in Woking



About seven miles east from my beauty salon in Woking lies a village called Ockham. William of Ockham (or Occam) was born here. He was an English Franciscan friar who lived from 1285 to 1347. He is known for ‘Occam’s Razor’, a principle which can be paraphrased as ‘the simplest solution is most likely the right one’.


This may not be entirely unrelated to having a waxing, although a razor is not used. But a waxing can raze away unwanted or unsightly hair from various parts of the body, giving a pleasant aesthetic appearance.



We may not know what waxing, or similar methods, were around in William’s time of the 14th Century. If they were somewhat hair-raising, in the sense of the medieval health treatments operating then, with standards of hygiene and sanitation being questionable, we can be assured that this is not the case today.  You can find it as a hair-depleting experience, in the literal sense, if you should you choose to have a waxing.

Yet – no pain, no gain? The desire for waxing or other beauty treatments for whatever reason, may need to over-ride the law of parsimony. This again brings William in, as it is the name given to the Occam’s Razor principle. It means extreme unwillingness to spend money or use resources.

Paying out, within one’s means, can give satisfaction, pleasure, and contentment, with having experienced a beauty treatment from a fine massage therapist. 


There’s this one here in the 21st Century, seven and a half miles west of where William was born. Pop down the road from Ockham, or from further afield sometime soon, where a warm welcome awaits.

Friday, 28 February 2020

Why Should I have a Hot Stone Massage?



It is true that massage is a ‘hands-on’ experience, or it could be called a ‘stones-on’ experience if you are having a hot stone massage. In this, there is the benefit of human touch from a masseur, whether as a general help, or to relieve particular aches or pains or stresses. One can trust to the masseur for the session, not having to do anything oneself, but simply to relax and enjoy the session.

The masseur’s hands and temperature of the room will be warm enough to be comfortable and pleasant, along with the atmosphere of the room, helping to give a relaxing ambience. 



There is the experience of feeling the masseur’s hands, whether gliding softly, maybe with oil, or maybe more firmly where needed in certain areas. With hot stones there is the feeling of the stones on one’s body, and gradually decreasing in heat until newly-heated stones are applied. 

One may have some unusual reactions from massage, though not harmful. They may arise, in some cases, from one’s subconscious, such as tingles or shivers, even on a warm day, or extra warmth, even on a cold day. One can go with the flow of these, as nothing sinister or dangerous is happening.


Also during the massage one may breathe deeply in and out, all helping to contribute towards the balance, or restoring of balance, between body, soul, and spirit. This can enable us to feel human again, if feeling stressed out, and give a true impression of massage as wholly therapeutic. Hopefully clients find the massage is, or has been, well worth it.

Friday, 21 February 2020

Why should I have a Massage?



In the hustle and bustle often of everyday life, if you get a chance, make time for a massage. It can be beneficial and therapeutic.

It can be true that there are experiences and feelings beyond the literal ‘surface’ massage, where one can relax and be eased of strains and stresses. 


These could be psychosomatic - something of the body affecting the soul or spirit, or vice versa, where aches and pains of the body may be due to some strain or tension within. These can arise from the soul or spirit, in the complexity of each human being.

So a hands-on massage can ease surface tensions, and also more deep-seated matters. The peace, comfort, good feelings, etc, of a good massage can be retained after the actual massage session, or at least to some extent.

It helps to give oneself enough time, and to plan around the massage appointment, such as not being heavily dependent on time constraints. For example, if dashing off immediately after the massage to catch a bus or train, making a tight schedule for oneself, it could mean that the beneficial aspects of the massage are soon lost. This is a pity, as something positive, healing, helpful will likely have taken place during the massage or hopefully not too long after it.

It may be that a masseur has ‘healing hands’, though this is not only a one-way thing, if we do believe he/she has healing hands. 


There is also the client’s receptivity too, and their openness for the massage to be, to a good degree, what they wish it to be. 

They can bring their expectations to the massage session, and so find it as a two-way process between the masseur and the client, in co-operation, so covering psychological (soul, spirit) as well as physiological (body) aspects, for a truly wholesome massage.